Checking HTTP Request/Response in PowerShell

Checking HTTP Request/Response in PowerShell

This is as much for my reference as it may be yours, but here is a quick PowerShell script to check a HTTP request/response. # Create the request $HTTP_Request = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create('http://www.google.com') # Get the response $HTTP_Response = $HTTP_Request.GetResponse() # Get the HTTP as a interger $HTTP_Status = [int]$HTTP_Response.StatusCode If ($HTTP_Status -eq 200) { Write-Host "Site is OK!" } Else { Write-Host "The Site may be down, please check!" } # Clean up and close the request.
Geocoding Address Information: Part 2

Geocoding Address Information: Part 2

As mentioned in my previous post the eventual goal is to geocode address information from a couple of tables within an ERP database. Real time update was not a concern so I created a console application in C# that could be scheduled as a windows task. For obtaining the Geocode information I used Microsoft/BingMapsRESTToolkit which is available as a nuget package. In order to use the api you must acquire a key.
Geocoding Address Information: Part I

Geocoding Address Information: Part I

The eventual goal is to geocode address information from a couple of tables within an ERP database. Real time update was not a concern so I created a console application in C# that could be scheduled as a windows task. For obtaining the Geocode information I used Microsoft/BingMapsRESTToolkit which is available as a nuget package. In order to use the api you must acquire a key. To start things off let’s just put together a quick proof of concept.
There, Here, and Where I'm Going: A Software Developer's Tale

There, Here, and Where I'm Going: A Software Developer's Tale

Today was my last day at Radio Systems Corporation. The decision to leave did not come over night and it wasn’t easy to make. I started my career fresh out of college as a Software Engineer in 2011 with Health Care Service Corporation in Chicago, IL. I spent two years with HCSC working on high-volume transaction processing which were COBOL programs converted to asynchronous Java programs spend across several machines. As far as the technicalities of these programs I don’t remember much, but what I do remember are the people I worked with.
2017: Postmortem

2017: Postmortem

First Things First 2017 was a great year for me personally and professionally. At work, I migrated from the Enterprise Resource Planning team to the Software Development team. I attended a couple conferences here in the Southeast. I participated in 3 game jams and several other projects through the year. I’d like to take some time now to reflect on this year’s journey and start thinking about the roadmap for 2018.